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Road Trip: Napa Valley

Type 1 diabetes makes everything about life much more complicated It involves way more planning than we've ever done just to head out the door on a daily basis. However, we don't let that stop us from adventuring like we did on this most recent road trip to Napa Valley, CA. My husband had a long weekend off all the way up util the Fourth of July. So, we decided on driving up to Napa since we've never been before - even when I previously lived in Southern California on my own. We managed to book a pet-friendly hotel at the Meritage Resort and Spa. The road trip plus one bathroom stop and another stop for lunch at Denny's along the 5 freeway on the way to the hotel took about a total of 7 1/2 hours. FYI, Denny's has the nutritional menu on the table for every item! Stay away from their fluffy pancakes unless you wanna be "high" (BG over 200 mg/dL) for hours post-prandial. I failed that even using Fiasp in the pump, but at least she was content and fell bac…
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About That A1C

What is an A1C test? A1C is shorthand for "HbA1C" or glycated hemoglobin. It is a blood test, usually done by finger prick at modern clinics and hospitals, used to diagnose diabetes and asses how well someone is managing their disease. The A1C value is a number that reflects your average blood glucose (BG) over the course of three months - which is why most patients see their endocrinologist every three months. More importantly, red blood cells typically live over the course of 2-3 months, so the A1C measures the hemoglobin's exposure to glucose over that period. This amount is reflected as a percentage (for mg/dL metrics) or ratio (for mmol/mol metrics). Glucose is a sugar that enters your bloodstream from the foods you eat. In short, the higher your A1C, the more glucose is attached to your red blood cells.

Why is this number important?

It's important to set some guidelines or goals, but the A1C does not paint a whole picture. For example, someone with frequent hyp…

Oahu Trip

I was born and raised on Oahu, HI and am part Native Hawaiian. A lot of people have this common misconception that if you're born in Hawaii, that makes you Hawaiian. However, that simply isn't true. To be Native Hawaiian, is a racial - not a geographical, birthright. Native Hawaiian runs in both my families bloodlines. I just happen to carry more Okinawan and Native American physical traits than the majority of my family members. I have traveled back and forth to Hawaii from Los Angeles many times. Each time I come back to the islands, it feels more like I'm returning "home" than just coming back for a vacation.


Throughout our recent Oahu trip, we met some old friends, shared some laughs, and ate some damn good "ono" (delicious) food. Even though we struggled with toddler tantrums, crazy blood sugars, traffic, and a slight pump malfunction; we still managed to have fun beyond type one. Which is also why I'll try to focus this particular post more o…