Skip to main content

Posts

Traveling with T1d

Type 1 diabetes doesn't take a vacation even when we need one. Sure, when Coral was first diagnosed, I dreaded packing everything in addition to normal toddler things like sippy cups and diapers. Our first "vacation" with Type 1 diabetes was simple as can be. We took an outer island trip from Oahu to Maui and we stayed at the Sheraton on the Ka'anapali coast. It was awesome! Any hotel with a fridge is a must-have to store insulin and other perishable snacks such as yogurt or milk. A kitchenette is even better. We managed just fine with only her Dexcom G5 and MDI - no pump until April 2017.


Then, we moved from Oahu to California Fall of 2016. Big move, packing was a pain in the butt including moving my two dogs with us. Since living in Cali, we have traveled once back to Oahu to visit family in Fall of 2017 and will soon be headed back again. We plan to visit Hawaii at least once a year. Therefore, any tips I mention below will be based on how I pack whenever we trav…
Recent posts

Fiasp First Try

We finally got our new Endo to prescribe us Fiasp! For those who don’t know, Fiasp (fee-asp) is the latest and fastest mealtime insulin manufactured by Novo Nordisk available in a FlexTouch Pen or vial. It is advised that you take the same safety precautions before using Fiasp as you would any other fast-acting insulin such as Novolog or Humalog. Fiasp is considered a rapid insulin because it contains the addition of niacinamide (vitamin B3) and a formulation-stabilizing amino acid (L-Arginine). B3 increases speed of initial absorption while amino acid aids in the stabilization of the formulation.
Our First Try She was over 300 before dinner - ideal for testing this out. No thanks to "low" binge eating in the car while I was driving after leaving the Spring Festival with a cup full of treats. I didn’t wanna give her a full pre-bolus for the snacks since she ran around so much at the playground, but I stacked her insulin as needed. We were soon on our way to pick up her Fisa…

Swimming with T1d

It's been a late, wet, and chilly winter for those of us in Los Angeles, California. If you've read our About Us page, you would know that we were used to living in a warmer tropical climate and spent most of our days at the beach. We started using the Dexcom G5 continuous glucose monitor in April of 2016 and have perfected our very own personal technique of keeping it on through sunscreen, sweat, pool, rain and bubble baths. We use a similar technique called the Tegaderm Sandwich for keeping her Animas OneTouch Ping insulin pump through those same challenges. Read on for more tips on swimming with a Dexcom and pump.



We've acclimated to living in the bustling city of Los Angeles and now prefer swimming in our resort style heated pool and jacuzzi during the Summer over the sediment-rich, cold, mysterious, and kelp-filled oceans here.

Don't even get me started if you live on the east coast or mid-west. Nothing compares to the year-round warm weather and clean waters of H…

Review: Simple Mills Cupcakes

I bought some Simple Mills vanilla cake mix and
vanilla frosting to make Coral cupcakes as part of celebrating her 2nd Diaversary or the anniversary of the day was she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. I pureed fresh strawberries with a bit of water and a dash of Stevia. I don't bake much nor do I measure before adding certain ingredients. I'm also pretty damn good at carb guessing.





Some of the reasons why I decided to add my own twist on the cake mix was because the first time I tried it - almost a year ago, it came out really dry and I made it as instructed on the box. Secondly, Coral absolutely loves strawberries! She'll eat 'em year round with a bit of honey or Stevia to sweeten them.

I was afraid I might have added too much water, but no more than 1/2 cup when I blended it with the strawberries. I was pleasantly surprised at how moist they came out!

I had finished baking the cupcakes (takes about 24-30 minutes) around 12:00pm that Saturday before we met up with…

Coral's 2nd Diaversary

A Diaversary is the anniversary of the day you were
diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. I also like to refer to it as the D-day. My daughter, Coral, was diagnosed on March 11, 2016. We choose to celebrate this day because she LIVED through it. She survived DKA or diabetes ketoacidosis - a very serious diabetic condition that can lead to a coma or even death if not treated with immediate medical attention and hospitalization. I still remember seeing her fight with all of her might as the nurses strapped her down on a little board so they could put the IV in her tiny arms to give her vital fluids and insulin. Read more about DKA here and Our Diagnosis Story.

It's difficult not to think about that horrid weekend whenever her D-day comes around. We distract ourselves with trips to the toy store, baking her Simple Mills cupcakes with the same brand frosting, and surrounding her with other T1dlittles like we did this past Sunday (late post - I've been editing the video all night as soo…

T1d Takes its Toll

Most days, I can manage this disease just fine

However, I just did not want to deal with it today. It all started when I woke around 9am to check her glucose on the Dexcom app on my iPhone and saw the infamous "???" She's always properly hydrated and the transmitter was securely intact. These are some of the standard trouble-shooting issues Tech Support will ask in addition to where is it placed (discussed later, keep reading) if you request a complimentary replacement. With that said, this typically means that the enzymes at the tip of the sensor under the skin in the interstitial fluid has worn out. More specifically, it lacks a chemical electro enzyme reaction to generate a signal strong enough to transmit to your Dexcom receiver and/or smart device(s). Today was only the sixth day of that sensor when it should last seven days. We didn't bother to request a replacement since it wouldn't arrive until Monday morning anyways. It just wasn't worth the phone c…

Dexcom Tegaderm Sandwich

The Dexcom Tegaderm Sandwich
is simply a method I've used and perfected since Coral's previous D-nurse mentioned it to help keep her Dexcom G5 CGM sensor on for the minimum of seven days without any skin irritation. Coral has sensitive skin and cannot wear any fabric dressings such as Grif Grips, Pump Peelz or even Tough Pads. She can't even use Skin Tac because it causes a severe rash with tiny red bumps and is extremely painfully itchy. See Dexcom calibration tips below.
Firstly, I'd like to strongly advise that you refer to Dexcom's User Guide and Setup Wizard before and in addition to this blog. It's available direct from the app on your smart phone - which I hope you've installed before coming here. This will eliminate basic questions such as, "How do you start the sensor?" or "Do you need the [G5] receiver with you at all times?" or "How often are you supposed to change the sensor?" Also, understand that Dexcom may not b…