Skip to main content

Blue November

November is diabetes awareness month

and I'd like to kick it off by referring you to A) Our Diagnosis Story and B) A fact each day about diabetes particularly pertaining to Type 1 diabetes. The best thing anyone can do to support a loved one or someone they know who has any type of diabetes is to take the initiative to learn more. I cannot stress that enough. Then, perhaps they will actually know what to say and how to be genuinely supportive.

You'll find these daily posts on Instagram @type1diabetic_life where you may share and tag @type1diabetic_life when reposting to your own profile. I'll be updating this blog post and adding a new one every Sunday to recap each week of #diabetesawareness throughout the month of November. Starting with the following:
A post shared by T1dlife (@type1diabetic_life) on

Day 1: Did you know that there are more than two types of diabetes?

  • Type 1 - T1d is an autoimmune disease where the body’s immune system attacks the beta cells of the pancreas making that person insulin dependent. Only treatment: Insulin by daily injections or pump. πŸ’‰
  • Type 2 - Due to poor lifestyle choices, body becomes insulin resistant and beta cell insufficiency progresses if healthier decisions are not made soon. Treatment: lifestyle changes, diabetes medications, insulin. 🍩
  • Type 3 - a new term proposed for those with Alzheimer’s disease resulting in resistance to insulin in the brain. Researchers are still determining which diabetes medications will be best for treating this degenerative disease along with incretin mimetic drugs for preventing Alzheimer’s. πŸ•°
  • Gestational - temporary insulin resistance developed during pregnancy. Treatment: lifestyle changes, insulin, risk of developing Type 2 or even Type 1 later in life is markedly increased. 🀰🏼
  • LADA - Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood or “Type 1 1/2” is a partial autoimmune attack on beta cells resulting in some insulin resistance that slowly progresses to full insulin dependence. Treatment: Insulin, diabetic medications in early stages. πŸ‘¨πŸ»πŸ‘©πŸ½
  • Neonatal - genetic defect limiting beta cells’ ability to make insulin. Treatment: Insulin πŸ‘ΆπŸ»
  • MODY - Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young is a genetic defect that limits the pancreas’s ability to secrete sufficient amounts of insulin. Lifestyle changes, diabetes medications, insulin. πŸ“ˆ
. . .
Sources: Scheiner, Gary, MS, CDE. "Think Like a Pancreas."
Diabetes.co.uk. "Type 3 diabetes," http://www.diabetes.co.uk/type3-diabetes.html


Day 2: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease not a lifestyle disease like Type 2

Type1diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the body’s immune system attacks the insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas making that person insulin dependent - meaning they need insulin to live either by multiple daily injections or pump. There’s no other treatment and no cure in sight. They’re pancreas is broken. You cannot prevent, reverse or outgrow this damn life-threatening disease. For the record, it is NOT caused by poor diet or lack of exercise. Type1diabetics needacure. #shareifyoucare and tag @type1diabetic_life. πŸ’ͺπŸΌπŸ™πŸΌπŸ’™
. . .
Mahalo to all those who’ve purchased this T-shirt design and for supporting my small online zazzle shop. Next giveaway to a lucky family happens when @type1diabetic_life reaches 500 followers. Live well for the present truly is a gift. 🎁

A post shared by T1dlife (@type1diabetic_life) on

Day 3: Immediate Benefits of Diabetes Control

  • Increased energy ⚡️
  • More restful sleep 😴
  • Improved physical performance πŸ„πŸ»‍♀️
  • Appetite reduction 🍴
  • Brain power πŸ€“
  • Stable moods/emotions ☺️
  • Fewer sick days πŸ‘ŒπŸΌ
  • Healthier skin & gums 😬
  • Personal Safety πŸš—
  • Predictable menstrual cycle πŸ“†
Emphasis on appetite reduction: High blood glucose (BG) levels tend to make T1d’s crave more carby foods. This is because the amount of sugar in the bloodstream isn’t as important as the amount that gets into the cells. If not enough sugar enters, hunger increases. That’s why it’s so important to keep BG levels in range. 〰
. . .
Sources: Scheiner, Gary, MS, CDE. “Think Like a Pancreas, p 14, 16. πŸ“”
. . .
Have a #goodglucose #friday everybody! Don’t forget to tag @type1diabetic_life when reposting. Mahalo. πŸ€™πŸΌπŸ’™πŸ’ͺ🏼

A post shared by T1dlife (@type1diabetic_life) on

Day 4: Long-term Benefits of Blood Sugar Control

  • Healthy eyes and kidneysπŸ‘€
  • Strong heart❤️
  • Adequate blood flowπŸ‘ŒπŸΌ
  • Proper nerve function✊🏼
  • Protective nerve sensation☝🏼
  • Minimal painπŸ‘³πŸΌ‍♀️
  • Healthy feetπŸ‘£
  • Intact memoryπŸ’‘
  • Flexible joints πŸ’ͺ🏼
  • Mental health πŸ‘©πŸ»
  • Successful pregnancy🀰🏼
You know those horror stories people love to share with you about someone they knew who lost a limb, went blind, suffered from nerve damage or needed kidney dialysis? Well, use that fear and anger as a powerful motivator or as Scheiner likes to call it, “management fuel,” to take control of your diabetes. The threats are real so you need to get real with yourself too or you will soon see the consequences of diabetes denial and neglect in less than a matter of 5-10yrs. πŸš‘
. . .
Source: Sources: Scheiner, Gary, MS, CDE. “Think Like a Pancreas, p 19-26. πŸ“”
. . .
Follow, share and tag @type1diaebtic_life when reposting and let’s keep spreading #diabetesawareness. Mahalo!☝🏼πŸ’ͺ🏼

A post shared by T1dlife (@type1diabetic_life) on

Day 5: The Honeymoon Phase

or the “calm before the storm” is a period of time when you’re newly diagnosed as a #Type1diabetic and have just started necessary insulin treatment. This allows any remaining beta cells in the pancreas that the immune system hasn’t destroyed yet to take a break. Meaning, a newly diagnosed T1d may still produce a bit of insulin before doses will need to be increased. This period can last anywhere from weeks, months to years. 🀞🏼
. . .
Source: Sources: Scheiner, Gary, MS, CDE. “Think Like a Pancreas,” p 31, 32. πŸ“”
. . .
Follow, share and tag @type1diaebtic_lifewhen reposting and let’s keep spreading #diabetesawareness. Cheers to rocking the first week of November! πŸ’ͺπŸΌπŸ‘πŸΌπŸ‘πŸΌ

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Probing the Pod: In-Depth Review

It's been four weeks since we switched from the Animas OneTouch Ping to the Omnipod insulin pump. We like it for the most part, but there are some issues that require serious attention as we believe the majority of Podders may not even be aware of the matter. That will be discussed along with a comparison between the Ping and the Pod and a list of the Pods pros and cons. This particular article is not meant to stray or convince anyone to make any decisions about going from MDI to pumping or selecting the Omnipod in general. It is primarily for informative, experiential purposes and always focused on what we feel is best for our precious Coral.

So far, the most pertinent issue we've discovered is the lack of insulin delivery accuracy. This is largely due to the multiple plastic parts in the Pod itself (see Figure A below). Not necessarily due to any foods, absorption, or hormones. We know this because we've been logging her BGs, doses, basals, and carbs with the Dexcom G5 …

About That A1C

What is an A1C test? A1C is shorthand for "HbA1C" or glycated hemoglobin. It is a blood test, usually done by finger prick at modern clinics and hospitals, used to diagnose diabetes and asses how well someone is managing their disease. The A1C value is a number that reflects your average blood glucose (BG) over the course of three months - which is why most patients see their endocrinologist every three months. More importantly, red blood cells typically live over the course of 2-3 months, so the A1C measures the hemoglobin's exposure to glucose over that period. This amount is reflected as a percentage (for mg/dL metrics) or ratio (for mmol/mol metrics). Glucose is a sugar that enters your bloodstream from the foods you eat. In short, the higher your A1C, the more glucose is attached to your red blood cells.

Why is this number important?

It's important to set some guidelines or goals, but the A1C does not paint a whole picture. For example, someone with frequent hyp…

Road Trip: Napa Valley

Type 1 diabetes makes everything about life much more complicated It involves way more planning than we've ever done just to head out the door on a daily basis. However, we don't let that stop us from adventuring like we did on this most recent road trip to Napa Valley, CA. My husband had a long weekend off all the way up util the Fourth of July. So, we decided on driving up to Napa since we've never been before - even when I previously lived in Southern California on my own. We managed to book a pet-friendly hotel at the Meritage Resort and Spa. The road trip plus one bathroom stop and another stop for lunch at Denny's along the 5 freeway on the way to the hotel took about a total of 7 1/2 hours. FYI, Denny's has the nutritional menu on the table for every item! Stay away from their fluffy pancakes unless you wanna be "high" (BG over 200 mg/dL) for hours post-prandial. I failed that even using Fiasp in the pump, but at least she was content and fell bac…