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Christmas Wish

All I want for Christmas is a cure for Type 1 diabetes

Coral Deng, 6 weeks old, and her Dexcom G5 receiver used since June 2016

Lately, I've come across even fellow [older] Type 1 diabetics who take the backseat of managing this relentless disease and think it's not all that bad. Sure, I can ask them, "What is your a1c?" or "Have your parents helped you manage this life-threatening disease this far?" Yet, I haven't - and there's too many who have that mentality. Regardless, my husband and I are solely responsible for managing T1d until Coral is old enough to A) understand it completely, B) check her own blood glucose by pricking her tiny finger with the lancet and lancing device and putting the strip to that bright red drop of blood, and C) give herself calculated shots or boluses from her pump as needed. Sure, it may be easier for a T1d adult, but NOT for my T1dtoddler. That ain't even the half of it. If you continue to read past this point, well, thanks in advance and it's probably 'cause you actually want to learn more about how to care for your child. Read our bio and you'll understand why we don't take shit for granted and we're real AF.

We aren't "new" at this and are fully aware of all the detrimental effects even mediocre diabetes management can lead to her health in a matter of several years, and we choose not to risk that especially when MOST constant high blood sugars are PREVENTABLE. That is one of the main reason's why we constantly research the best technology out there for managing her T1d such as an artificial pancreas, beta cell or stem cell treatments, and other closed-looped pump systems.

Type 1 diabetes is a f*cked up disease and I pray to whatever f*ckin' "god" you believe in that you or your child never get this autoimmune disease. There is no cure. It's not preventable. Can't outgrow it. Not caused by sugar (I'm constantly repeating myself)....read my previous posts. Yeah, Coral will grow up and may not realize how threatening this disease can be and come out stronger than she already is - but you're missing the point and I can't educate you further. This is realism at its finest. I'm not a pessimist. Used to be an optimist, surfer, still a designer. Get real with your self and gain tighter control of T1d or its YOU or your childs' health you're risking. BTW, Technology is only as good as its user.

BOTTOM LINE: Fellow diabetics of all types, don't make this disease any less serious than it is. We are already working against decades of marketing tactics and falsified information to prove otherwise. If you are the parent or caregiver of a Type 1 diabetic, would you want them to endure a decent life of an average BG of 220 or a prosperous, healthy, long life of an average 120mg/dL? That's a big difference. If you can't see that, than I can't help you.

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