Skip to main content

Cookies for Santa

We made cookies for Santa this evening

but they weren't your typical Tollhouse cookies. These were Good Dee's Mix Snickerdoodle cookies. The mixture comes in a resealable bag, which isn't necessary since the entire bag only makes about 12-13 cookies. All you need to add is 1 (one) egg and 1tsp vanilla extract and mix well until blended. I need to get a mini ice cream scooper for when I make cookies again because it is kind of a pain to scoop the thick sticky mixture into perfect balls and place onto parchment paper with just two ordinary spoons.


The instructions on the bag says to bake for 11-13 minutes or unti ledges are browned. I set my oven timer for 11 minutes, inserted a wooden toothpick and the batter still stuck to it. I replaced the baking sheet, closed the oven door, and added another five minutes to the timer. A second toothpick check still had me wondering if this is how these cookies are supposed to be in the oven, thick and soft. Once I took them out and let sit on the stovetop for five minutes, they definitely hardened some more - kind of like The Diabetic Kitchen cookies. I guess most low-carb cookie mixes are like that. I'm not a baker and prefer to cook by taste.




The finished cookies came out crumbly on the outside and a bit moist - not chewy, on the inside. I plated a few for my family and I to share. At only 2g net carbs, this is the perfect guilt-free snack for even non-diabetics. I bolused Coral for two 3" cookies and there was no spike in her BG! I saved a few for Santa with a glass of cold Fairlife milk. I hope he approves of them too. Most importantly, I hope he grants us our Christmas wish for a cure for Type 1 diabetes.

As we say in Hawaiian back home, "Mele Kalikimaka!" May you all have good glucose and a very Merry Christmas. Don't take your health for granted.

Dear Santa, Enjoy the Good Dee's Snickerdoodle cookies. They're low carb! Please help us find a cure for Type 1 diabetes soon. Merry Christmas, The Dengs

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

About That A1C

What is an A1C test? A1C is shorthand for "HbA1C" or glycated hemoglobin. It is a blood test, usually done by finger prick at modern clinics and hospitals, used to diagnose diabetes and asses how well someone is managing their disease. The A1C value is a number that reflects your average blood glucose (BG) over the course of three months - which is why most patients see their endocrinologist every three months. More importantly, red blood cells typically live over the course of 2-3 months, so the A1C measures the hemoglobin's exposure to glucose over that period. This amount is reflected as a percentage (for mg/dL metrics) or ratio (for mmol/mol metrics). Glucose is a sugar that enters your bloodstream from the foods you eat. In short, the higher your A1C, the more glucose is attached to your red blood cells.

Why is this number important?

It's important to set some guidelines or goals, but the A1C does not paint a whole picture. For example, someone with frequent hyp…

Our Diagnosis Story

Coral was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes on Friday, March 11, 2016 at nearly 16 months of age. Three days prior, I had noticed she was very lethargic, peeing heavy diapers, wetting her bed, and super thirsty. I never knew these were classic signs of T1d - nobody ever tells you that! I had emailed her pediatrician Thursday evening with my concerns. Friday at 8:00am PST, Dr. Quensell calls and asks, "Where are you?" I put my fork down and struggled to swallow a bite of sunny-side-up eggs. "Just finishing up breakfast," I replied hesitantly. "I need to see Coral right now," and we hung up the phone. My husband, Weiran, was just about to leave for work with his foot out the door. I told him, "That was Dr. Quensell, it isn't good. You should come with us."

We packed her diaper bag with one change of clothes without knowing what to expect. Dr. Quensell's office at Kapiolani Medical Center for Women & Children was fully scheduled that da…

Oahu Trip

I was born and raised on Oahu, HI and am part Native Hawaiian. A lot of people have this common misconception that if you're born in Hawaii, that makes you Hawaiian. However, that simply isn't true. To be Native Hawaiian, is a racial - not a geographical, birthright. Native Hawaiian runs in both my families bloodlines. I just happen to carry more Okinawan and Native American physical traits than the majority of my family members. I have traveled back and forth to Hawaii from Los Angeles many times. Each time I come back to the islands, it feels more like I'm returning "home" than just coming back for a vacation.


Throughout our recent Oahu trip, we met some old friends, shared some laughs, and ate some damn good "ono" (delicious) food. Even though we struggled with toddler tantrums, crazy blood sugars, traffic, and a slight pump malfunction; we still managed to have fun beyond type one. Which is also why I'll try to focus this particular post more o…