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Cookies for Santa

We made cookies for Santa this evening

but they weren't your typical Tollhouse cookies. These were Good Dee's Mix Snickerdoodle cookies. The mixture comes in a resealable bag, which isn't necessary since the entire bag only makes about 12-13 cookies. All you need to add is 1 (one) egg and 1tsp vanilla extract and mix well until blended. I need to get a mini ice cream scooper for when I make cookies again because it is kind of a pain to scoop the thick sticky mixture into perfect balls and place onto parchment paper with just two ordinary spoons.


The instructions on the bag says to bake for 11-13 minutes or unti ledges are browned. I set my oven timer for 11 minutes, inserted a wooden toothpick and the batter still stuck to it. I replaced the baking sheet, closed the oven door, and added another five minutes to the timer. A second toothpick check still had me wondering if this is how these cookies are supposed to be in the oven, thick and soft. Once I took them out and let sit on the stovetop for five minutes, they definitely hardened some more - kind of like The Diabetic Kitchen cookies. I guess most low-carb cookie mixes are like that. I'm not a baker and prefer to cook by taste.




The finished cookies came out crumbly on the outside and a bit moist - not chewy, on the inside. I plated a few for my family and I to share. At only 2g net carbs, this is the perfect guilt-free snack for even non-diabetics. I bolused Coral for two 3" cookies and there was no spike in her BG! I saved a few for Santa with a glass of cold Fairlife milk. I hope he approves of them too. Most importantly, I hope he grants us our Christmas wish for a cure for Type 1 diabetes.

As we say in Hawaiian back home, "Mele Kalikimaka!" May you all have good glucose and a very Merry Christmas. Don't take your health for granted.

Dear Santa, Enjoy the Good Dee's Snickerdoodle cookies. They're low carb! Please help us find a cure for Type 1 diabetes soon. Merry Christmas, The Dengs

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