Skip to main content

Steady Overnight

I recently bought a couple bottles (2g net carbs) and cans (2g carbs) of Pure Protein shakes from Trader Joes. It's pretty thick and best to thin it out with a bit of water or milk. They taste pretty good though and Coral definitely approved. It's also a healthier alternative to Wahoo or Hershey's syrup.



To find a Pure Protein retailer near you, click here.
When her BG began to trend downwards from 99mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter) , I gave her 4oz of the bottle mixed with 3oz @fairlife milk (total carbs = 6g, 10g protein). She spiked a little and I had to bolus her a few times overnight. At least I didn't have to wake her to drink some juice to treat a low BG. We’ll see how tonight goes when we try the shake again.

Fellow Instagram T1d Tip: Also check out Hood Calorie Countdown milk (3g carbs per cup). Sold at Albertson's in California. For other retailers in your area, click here.




Everyday is an experiment. Everyday is a gift. Mothers of children with diseases know that all too well. We need no reminders to see the positives in our lives because we’re always with them.

BOTTOM LINE: High protein and fiber will keep a Type 1 diabetics BG levels steady overnight. Anticipate a spike in BG within about an hour after drinking a high protein shake especially when mixed with milk. The slow raise in BG is due to the fat content in milk, which delays the breakdown of lactose your body uses for energy. Too much protein and no carbs will cause your body to burn fat instead of sugary carbs for energy, which also raises BG. Kind of like when you eat eggs and no starches (aka carbs) with breakfast.

Hope you all have a good glucose night!

Sources: "Milk and Diabetes." Diabetes.co.uk and "Can Milk Raise Glucose Levels?" Livestrong.com

* * *
Disclaimer: The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. All photos, unless specified otherwise, are the sole property of Typeonediabetic-life and may not be used or duplicated in any fashion without written consent.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

About That A1C

What is an A1C test? A1C is shorthand for "HbA1C" or glycated hemoglobin. It is a blood test, usually done by finger prick at modern clinics and hospitals, used to diagnose diabetes and asses how well someone is managing their disease. The A1C value is a number that reflects your average blood glucose (BG) over the course of three months - which is why most patients see their endocrinologist every three months. More importantly, red blood cells typically live over the course of 2-3 months, so the A1C measures the hemoglobin's exposure to glucose over that period. This amount is reflected as a percentage (for mg/dL metrics) or ratio (for mmol/mol metrics). Glucose is a sugar that enters your bloodstream from the foods you eat. In short, the higher your A1C, the more glucose is attached to your red blood cells.

Why is this number important?

It's important to set some guidelines or goals, but the A1C does not paint a whole picture. For example, someone with frequent hyp…

Our Diagnosis Story

Coral was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes on Friday, March 11, 2016 at nearly 16 months of age. Three days prior, I had noticed she was very lethargic, peeing heavy diapers, wetting her bed, and super thirsty. I never knew these were classic signs of T1d - nobody ever tells you that! I had emailed her pediatrician Thursday evening with my concerns. Friday at 8:00am PST, Dr. Quensell calls and asks, "Where are you?" I put my fork down and struggled to swallow a bite of sunny-side-up eggs. "Just finishing up breakfast," I replied hesitantly. "I need to see Coral right now," and we hung up the phone. My husband, Weiran, was just about to leave for work with his foot out the door. I told him, "That was Dr. Quensell, it isn't good. You should come with us."

We packed her diaper bag with one change of clothes without knowing what to expect. Dr. Quensell's office at Kapiolani Medical Center for Women & Children was fully scheduled that da…

Oahu Trip

I was born and raised on Oahu, HI and am part Native Hawaiian. A lot of people have this common misconception that if you're born in Hawaii, that makes you Hawaiian. However, that simply isn't true. To be Native Hawaiian, is a racial - not a geographical, birthright. Native Hawaiian runs in both my families bloodlines. I just happen to carry more Okinawan and Native American physical traits than the majority of my family members. I have traveled back and forth to Hawaii from Los Angeles many times. Each time I come back to the islands, it feels more like I'm returning "home" than just coming back for a vacation.


Throughout our recent Oahu trip, we met some old friends, shared some laughs, and ate some damn good "ono" (delicious) food. Even though we struggled with toddler tantrums, crazy blood sugars, traffic, and a slight pump malfunction; we still managed to have fun beyond type one. Which is also why I'll try to focus this particular post more o…