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Slow-Cooker Oxtail Soup

I always try to find simple low-carbish meals to cook

Per my previous post, I recently ordered some groceries from milkandeggs.com specifically to make oxtail soup. A lot of my followers on Instagram have been asking me for the recipe since I've made it several times before. It's especially delicious during these winter months in Southern California. Don't forget, we're from Hawaii. Any time it gets under 60 degrees Fahrenheit, it's frickin' cold.

I don’t measure when I cook, only IF I bake. See how these measurements work out for you and add or subtract amounts as you see fit. Here’s what you'll need:

Ingredients
2 lbs oxtails
1 strip dried orange peel zest (optional)
2 star anise (optional)
2 oz fresh ginger 
1 Tbsp garlic salt to taste
1 Tbsp freshly cracked pepper to taste
2 Tbsp "shoyu" or soy sauce
1/8 tsp red chili flakes (optional)
1 Tbsp Better Than Bouillion Beef Base (optional for added flavor)
1/2 lb Daikon - Korean raddish
0.83 lbs Bok Choy - Chinese leafy cabbage
1/2 lb organic carrots (I used rainbow), sliced diagonally
1 Sweet or Yellow onion, chopped 1in

Garnishes
Fresh cilantro, chopped
Green onions, white and green parts sliced diagonally
Freshly grated ginger

Parboil oxtails and/or trim off excess fat (I save time by just putting it in the pot): Fill large soup pot with about 5 quarts water and bring to a boil. Add oxtails making sure they're fully emerged and parboil for 15min. Then, let simmer for 10min with lid slightly covered. The pot I use has a strainer lid (ikea). Strain water out and rinse oxtails with warm water. Cover and strain again removing any unwanted bloody fat. Let sit.

Next, prep slow-cooker by turning on to High setting. Keep lid closed. Meanwhile, in separate medium mixing bowl, add the following ingredients: star anises, dried orange peel zest, garlic salt, cracked pepper, red chili flakes, beef base, shoyu, add 3 cups hot water. Stir until well blended.

Then, gently place oxtails into slow-cooker layered on the bottom of cooker. Slowly pour wet mixture onto oxtails. Add an additional 6 cups water, close lid and secure. Let cook for four hours. Tend to your usual d-duties or what not.

Almost Pau ("finished" in Hawaiian Pidgin): The last 30 minutes, start chopping and slicing all your veggies - carrots, daikon, onions, and bok choy. Be sure to add to pot in that order. The bok choy should sit lightly submerged above everything else since it cooks the quickest. You may want to add a bit of more garlic salt at this point and stir gently with a large spoon. Again, close and securely seal lid. Let cook an additional 10min.

Finished!: Using a slotted spoon, add oxtails and veggies to a large soup bowl. Use a ladle to spoon out the broth and add to bowl. Garnish with desired amount of fresh cilantro, green onions and grated gingere. Enjoy!

Follow us on Instagram as @type1diabetic_life for more good eats, tips, and inspo! For our daily T1dLife, follow @t1disabeach.

Mahalo and live well,
Shelsea

P.S. Coral was in the mid-100's upon eating this meal so, we didn't bolus her. If she hadn't insisted on eating low-carb cottage cheese instead, we wouldn't have needed a bolus. Carb Guess = 10g for the cooked veggies. Log your own BG pre-meal, during, and after to see how you should bolus for your self or T1d child.

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