Skip to main content

Review: Simple Mills Cupcakes

I bought some Simple Mills vanilla cake mix and


vanilla frosting to make Coral cupcakes as part of celebrating her 2nd Diaversary or the anniversary of the day was she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. I pureed fresh strawberries with a bit of water and a dash of Stevia. I don't bake much nor do I measure before adding certain ingredients. I'm also pretty damn good at carb guessing.





Some of the reasons why I decided to add my own twist on the cake mix was because the first time I tried it - almost a year ago, it came out really dry and I made it as instructed on the box. Secondly, Coral absolutely loves strawberries! She'll eat 'em year round with a bit of honey or Stevia to sweeten them.

I was afraid I might have added too much water, but no more than 1/2 cup when I blended it with the strawberries. I was pleasantly surprised at how moist they came out!

I had finished baking the cupcakes (takes about 24-30 minutes) around 12:00pm that Saturday before we met up with some friends at the mall (previous post). I stored the remaining strawberry puree in the fridge with a closed lid. When we returned, I tried my best to mix the puree with the entire container of Simple Mills vanilla frosting, but it was so oily or buttery in texture that it repelled the rater watery strawberry puree. I was bummed since it didn't come out smooth like I had envisioned no matter how long I mixed it with my Kitchen Aid hand mixer. At least it was a beautiful natural dark pink color (as shown above).




Coral took one bite and was like, "Mmmm! Mommy, I like it! It's soo good. You're the best cook ever!" Really, she says that quite often - almost every meal.

Her starting BG was around the low 100's and I bolused her for half a cupcake with frosting that Saturday night. Basals were set for a high protein snack like the Premier Protein with Fairlife Milk (2-3oz PP/1oz milk) for the past few weeks as needed. However, this damn cupcake kept her high ALL night long. I gave multiple corrections with her pump and she just would not come down. I even set temp basal increases of 20% for 1-2 hours at a time and finally brought her back down to the low 100's before breakfast. That first night was a brutal battle of the 'betes for sure. Trust me, it wasn't anything else she ate or drank nor "dawn phenomenon" (growth hormones - haven't seen that in a long time).

So, I decided to test my cupcake / frosting theory again the second night on Sunday. Same exact thing happened even though I gave her a bigger bolus than the previous night and increased a couple more basals from 10:00pm. This mama was exhausted by Monday. I said to myself, "That last cupcake remaining in the fridge," as I opened the door to let the cold air hit my face and feet. "I'm gonna eat it when she's sleeping."


It is now Thursday night and I did just that. Try Simple Mills vanilla cake mix and frosting if you like, but heed my warning: It may make you spike and keep you high all night. May be it's because of the monk fruit in the frosting and the high fiber content. Who the heck knows?! Strawberries wouldn't keep her or most diabetics high that long because it's a simple carbohydrate and breaks down into glucose quicker than starches.

Nutrition Facts

Ingredients - Monk Fruit tends to make Coral's BGs rise steadily and slowly

If you're not on a pump, this might be an extremely challenging food to process and may be best eaten or experimented with during the day. Most new foods take a lot of practice to get the timing of the bolus right and to see how it affects your blood glucose 2-4 hours post-prandial (after eating). I'm happy she enjoyed it though. Referring to the frosting more than the actual cake, as usual.

As I've said before on my Instagram, some foods are worth the bolus. Unfortunately, this time and particular item of the Simple Mills line was not. However, we do love their new Soft Baked Chocolate Chip and Snickerdoodle Cookies. Some of our tried and true favs from their line include: Crunchy Chocolate Chip Cookies, Banana Muffin Bread, Chocolate Muffin mix, Banana Muffin mix, Pumpkin Muffin mix, and Farmhouse Cheddar Almond Flour Crackers. Yep, we've tried many of their products and they still remain one of our favorite brands since we started this T1dLife. Go to SimpleMills.com and let 'em know Shelsea of Typeonediabetic-life.com referred you. No, you won't get a discount, but at least they'll recognize where a certain percentage of their revenue comes from - the Type 1 diabetic community. Sadly, I have no sponsors yet. That would be a nice added perk of running a blog for Type 1 diabetics, wouldn't it? This has been an honest review to share our experiences with you in hopes that it will work in your favor should you decide to try it for yourself.

Sweet dreams everyone!
-Shelsea


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Dexcom G6 Review

It's been almost 30 days since we made the switch from Dexcom's G5 to G6 continuous glucose monitor or CGM system. We had a pretty positive experience for the most part, but the G6 definitely still has some kinks to work out. I'll address each and every issue we came across, list some pros and cons, and a comparison between the two systems.

The Good (Pros)Smaller profile - transmitter is slimmerNew touchscreen receiverDexcom claims it lasts up to 10 days of useDexcom claims sensor accuracy should not be affected by acetaminophen medicationLess finger pokes requiredNo calibration neededBetter algorithm - we have experienced better accuracy overall with both blood glucose (BG) readings and trend arrows with the G6 versus the G5 algorithm.Easy-to-use one-touch applicator - self-retracting needle leaves sensor in placeLess pain upon insertion of sensor  The Bad (Cons) Due to smaller profile, old sensor must be removed in order to "pop" transmitter out of clear sensor…

Our Diagnosis Story

Coral was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes on Friday, March 11, 2016 at nearly 16 months of age. Three days prior, I had noticed she was very lethargic, peeing heavy diapers, wetting her bed, and super thirsty. I never knew these were classic signs of T1d - nobody ever tells you that! I had emailed her pediatrician Thursday evening with my concerns. Friday at 8:00am PST, Dr. Quensell calls and asks, "Where are you?" I put my fork down and struggled to swallow a bite of sunny-side-up eggs. "Just finishing up breakfast," I replied hesitantly. "I need to see Coral right now," and we hung up the phone. My husband, Weiran, was just about to leave for work with his foot out the door. I told him, "That was Dr. Quensell, it isn't good. You should come with us."

We packed her diaper bag with one change of clothes without knowing what to expect. Dr. Quensell's office at Kapiolani Medical Center for Women & Children was fully scheduled that da…

Probing the Pod: In-Depth Review

It's been four weeks since we switched from the Animas OneTouch Ping to the Omnipod insulin pump. We like it for the most part, but there are some issues that require serious attention as we believe the majority of Podders may not even be aware of the matter. That will be discussed along with a comparison between the Ping and the Pod and a list of the Pods pros and cons. This particular article is not meant to stray or convince anyone to make any decisions about going from MDI to pumping or selecting the Omnipod in general. It is primarily for informative, experiential purposes and always focused on what we feel is best for our precious Coral.

So far, the most pertinent issue we've discovered is the lack of insulin delivery accuracy. This is largely due to the multiple plastic parts in the Pod itself (see Figure A below). Not necessarily due to any foods, absorption, or hormones. We know this because we've been logging her BGs, doses, basals, and carbs with the Dexcom G5 …